Mine’s a pint Einstein – The Science Show

MINE'S A PINT, EINSTEIN - THE SCIENCE SHOW

ABOUT: 

Wouldn’t it be great if you could get Einstein down the pub and ask him all the questions you’ve ever wanted to ask about life, the Universe and everything? Well, we can’t get Einstein but we can do the next best thing. On Mine’s A Pint, Einstein, we will interview some of the world’s front-rank scientists about the magic of science and give you the chance to post your own questions in the livestream chat for guests. Our host is the award-winning writer and broadcaster Marcus Chown. Formerly a radio astronomer at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, he is the author of best-selling books such as Quantum Theory Cannot Hurt YouBreakthrough and The Ascent of Gravity, which was The Sunday Times Science Book of the Year https://marcuschown.com/

Got ideas, comments or requests? Contact: thescienceshow@independencelive.net

NEXT SHOW: Imaging Black Holes – Mon 19/09/2022 7PM 

5 THINGS YOU MAY NOT KNOW ABOUT BLACK HOLES

  • Black holes were predicted by a soldier dying of agonising skin disease in a WWI field hospital but discovered by a man who celebrated by buying his children knickerbocker glories in a Hastings’ beachfront café.
  • If the Earth was a black hole, it would be the size of a Ferrero Rocher (mind you, it would be a very heavy Ferrero Rocher!).
  • There is a “supermassive black hole” in the heart of every galaxy – with a mass of up to 50 billion times that of the Sun – and nobody has the slightest idea why.
  • If you could hover on the outskirts of a black hole and look outwards, time would flow so slowly for you that you could watch the entire future history of the universe flash past your eyes like a movie in fast-forward.
  • Black holes are not actually black! (they glow with “Hawking radiation”).

GUEST: FERYAL ÖZEL

Feryal Özel is a Turkish-American astrophysicist born in Istanbul. Currently a professor at Georgia Tech in Atlanta, she was one of the key scientists working on the globe-spanning Event Horizon Telescope, which created the first-ever image of a black hole in April 2019. She also helped create, in 2022, the first-ever image of Sagittarius A*, the supermassive black hole at the heart of our Milky Way.

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